Frederick H. Campbell obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Frederick H. Campbell

June 14, 1923 - December 27, 2011

Obituary


In Memory of
FREDERICK HOLLISTER CAMPBELL
June 14, 1923 - December 27, 2011

Frederick Hollister Campbell, known to friends as Fred, Popio to his grandchildren, and Shred to young relatives who could not pronounce the "F" in his name, was born in Somerville, MA, on Flag Day, June 14, 1923, and left this world for Heaven on December 27, 2011, at 4 am at age 88 after a long illness. Throughout his three careers as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, (25 years, 2 months, and 27 days), a Colorado Springs attorney...

In Memory of
FREDERICK HOLLISTER CAMPBELL
June 14, 1923 - December 27, 2011

Frederick Hollister Campbell, known to friends as Fred, Popio to his grandchildren, and Shred to young relatives who could not pronounce the "F" in his name, was born in Somerville, MA, on Flag Day, June 14, 1923, and left this world for Heaven on December 27, 2011, at 4 am at age 88 after a long illness. Throughout his three careers as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, (25 years, 2 months, and 27 days), a Colorado Springs attorney (24 years), and adjunct professor of American history and pre-law at Colorado College and University of Colorado in Colorado Springs (13 years), Fred performed his duties and responsibilities with professionalism and kindness. He was a true gentleman and scholar.

Fred enlisted as a private in the U.S. Marine Corps on July 1, 1943, in Baltimore, MD, over the strong objections of his father. But, duty called and Fred answered that call. Fred remained active through July 10, 1946, when he was honorably discharged and remained as a reservist. He attended Dartmouth College, in Hanover, NH, while enlisting in the Marines and graduated following his stint in World War II with a degree in Political Science. Fred was a sergeant who earned a Navy Commendation Medal with "V" for valor for saving the lives of 250 fellow Marines at the Battle of Iwo Jima by organizing foxhole and trench digging that protected his men from heavy Japanese fire from the mountains above the beaches. He also fought gallantly at the Battle of Okinawa and was part of the Marine Corps team that was sent to Japan for reconstruction after the War ended. During that time period, Fred learned to speak fluent Japanese and enjoyed the friendships of many natives, including Soichi Ichida, who shared a love of stamp collecting. They remained dear friends for the rest of their lives.

Thanks to the GI bill and his enlistment in the US Marine Corps, Fred earned a Jurist Doctorate from Northwestern University in Chicago and became an attorney for the US Marine Corps until his retirement as Lt. Col. on December 31, 1967.
Fred's skill for leading troops was recognized by his commanding officers by selecting him to attend Officer's Candidate School (OCS) at Quantico Marine Corps Base, VA. He attended many Marine service schools from 1944-59. Because Fred entered the marines as a private and retired as a Lt. Col., he was known by fellow marines as a "Mustang," which is a distinction of great honor. One of his greatest Marine Corps memories was being honored by his NCOs at a special dinner.

Fred again enlisted for active duty in the U.S. Marine Corps as a lieutenant on December 13, 1950. He served in the Korean War and was honorably discharged for a second time on March 2, 1953. Between those two stints in the service, he fell in love and married the love of his life, Amy Strohm Campbell, on April 14, 1951. Fred and Amy met on a blind date, went square dancing, and, thanks to the matchmaker talents of Content Mottsmith, whose daughter was a student in Amy's second grade at Orrington School in Evanston, IL, they enjoyed 60 years together. Fred's theme song was, "Once in Love with Amy."

From this marriage came one child, Susan Hollister Campbell, who was born on July 15, 1952. Where you saw Fred, you always saw Amy. He was the ying, and she was the yang. Throughout their marriage they enjoyed many trips to Europe and once sailed through the Panama Canal. For many years they enjoyed dancing at the Broadmoor Resort and attended balls celebrating the birthday of the U.S. Marine Corps where dancing was a featured activity. The last dance Fred enjoyed with Amy was on October 10, 2009, when his youngest grandson Richard Reneau married Regan Elizabeth Austin in Missoula, MT, and the photo of them dancing is treasured by the family. The last airline trip for Fred was in February 2010 from Colorado Springs to Kennewick, WA, when his oldest grandson William John Reneau II married Tana Perkins on Feb. 20th. Photographs of Fred with Amy at that celebration are equally treasured by the family. The photo taken for this article, which is on the Swan-Law Funeral Home website, was taken by his daughter at John and Tana's wedding. Following service in Korea, Fred continued his career in the U.S. Marines as an attorney and served in the Vietnam War during 1965-1966.

Only 46,000 men fought in the three wars, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, and Fred was one of them. Fred was dedicated to his troops and said that training and leading them were the best parts of being a Marine. When asked what it took to be a good marine, he said the ability to dig, referencing his time on Iwo Jima, but never saying why.

While traveling from North Carolina's Camp LeJeune in 1959 to accept orders at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base in Oahu, Hawaii, Fred and Amy fell in love with Colorado and purchased property facing Fred's beloved Pikes Peak with plans to retire there, which they did in December 1967. His last tour of duty was as an attorney with JAG at the Navy Yards in Washington, D.C. Fred received more than 27 decorations for his service from 1943-67.

Following retirement Fred started his own private law practice with a specialty in estate planning and corporate law. He retired from that career at age 68 when he decided to earn a Ph.D. in American History from the University of Colorado in Boulder. He completed his requirements for his doctorate at age 73 and continued teaching American history and pre-law at Colorado College and University of Colorado in Colorado Springs for 13 years as an adjunct professor. He retired from teaching in 2003 at age 80. During his time in Colorado, he encouraged many young people to become attorneys, including Melissa Sugar, who is the daughter of one of his best friends in the military.

During his tenure in Colorado Springs, starting in 1968, Fred volunteered for many worthwhile organizations, including Boy's Village, Kiwanis Club International, Colorado Springs Symphony Orchestra, and the Rocky Mountain Nature Association, the fund-raising arm of Rocky Mountain National Park. Fred was president of the Rocky Mountain Nature Association for 17 years. He was recently recognized for his civic involvement by the Colorado Springs Bar Association.

Fred loved baseball and followed many National Baseball League teams over the years, as he traveled to Maryland, Washington, D.C., Florida, Ohio, and other locations around the USA, because his father was an executive with the B&O Railroad. Fred and Amy held season tickets for the Sky Socks, Fred's passion, for many years. When he could no longer attend Sky Socks games, he watched all the Colorado Rockies games on television.

He spent hours visiting the U.S. Capitol and watching Congress in session as a young boy and remembered rides on trolley cars. He loved jazz and classical music and was known for lecturing his family on the particulars of history throughout his life. He also loved stamp collecting from the age of five. Throughout his life Fred was dedicated to various Republican Party candidates and events. He was a long-time member and officer of his homeowner's association, and founder of the local Neighborhood Watch program there.
Fred is survived by his wife Amy, his daughter Susan and her husband Jack Reneau of Missoula, MT, grandsons John Reneau (Tana) of Blaine, WA, and their son Ryker. Hollister Reneau of Arlington, VA, and Richard Reneau (Regan) of Missoula, MT, and sister Anna May Conarty of Casper, WY. He leaves many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.

Arrangements for Fred's memorial service on Epiphany, January 6, 2012, were handled by Swan-Law Funeral Home of Colorado Springs. Expressions of sympathy can be sent there. Internment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery in Chicago, IL, in the spring of 2012.